No Stopping Harper

Brigette DePape, the now former Senate page, who gleefully abused her position by flashing a “Stop Harper” sign during the Throne Speech, attempts to explain the reasons behind her inappropriate stunt:

Noble though Ms. DePape’s intentional act of civil disobedience may have been, to claim – as she repeatedly did in this interview – that “three quarters of Canadians disagree with the Harper agenda” is just flat out incorrect.

The sorry fact of the matter is that the majority of Canadians really did vote in support of spending untold billions of dollars on dubious military hardware, vastly expanding the penal system, eliminating gun control, continuing the pointless wars in faraway lands, surrendering national sovereignty for the sake of a phantom “perimeter security” zone that will be negotiated in secret, engaging in so-called “free trade” agreements that accelerate the race to the global bottom line, and maintaining massive transfers of wealth in the form of egregious corporate welfare to “job creators” that are nothing of the sort.

What a pitiful commentary that the available political alternatives to that “agenda” were actually deemed by a majority of voters to be a less desirable offering…

25 Comments

Filed under HARPER Government of Canada

25 responses to “No Stopping Harper

  1. CWTF

    What I like is how some keep harping that she disrespected the institution…
    Shall we talk about Harper’s little playbook, his problems with Elections Canada and all the other ways he’s been eroding democracy?

    No one has ever accused the electorate of being “aware” of the issues – they usually vote for whatever marketing tripe and feeling they have. I don’t think that most supporters of Harper voted for what you enumerated, but likely for one micro-issue that they think their “fabulous leader” will bring about.

  2. All eligible voters did not vote. Of those that voted. about 25 percent of those voted for Harper…….she is right… the mahjority did not vote for him.

  3. Well, for those eligible voters who did not cast a ballot, they can go take a flying fuck at the moon for all their opinion matters. If they chose not to participate in the process, then they don’t have the right to bitch about the outcome. Simple as that.

    As for rest, please get your FACTS straight. According to Elections Canada, the Conservatives won 39.6% of the popular vote… so no, she is not right.

    And to automatically include everyone who didn’t cast a ballot in the election as being opposed to Harper is just wishful thinking on the part of those who are displeased with his “mahjority”…

  4. jkg

    I think what Elisa number was based on is the percentage of the actual population that voted for Harper, non voting individuals included. Since within 61.4 percent of the population who voted had 39.6 percent who voted CPC, that works out to 25 percent of the total population. However, including non voters doesn’t really add anything. One can only speculate as to the reasons why 40 percent of the population did not bother to vote. I have heard the laughable argument that silence implied consent of whatever the electoral result that occurred, as if though they were the satisfied with the status quo. It would help, though, if you were able to abstain from voting, but you cannot according Elections Canada rules.

    The FPTP with more than two parties will always return majorities with less than the majority of the popular vote as we know. Ironically, the features of this system were topics for Pre Prime Minister Harper to wax somberly about the “benign dictatorship” under Liberal regimes. How quickly his thrust for democratic reform was quickly forgotten when you started to benefit from it. Then again, his CPC acolytes probably would argue that this was rather inconsequential, since he and the CPC adapted to the electoral system to ensure their victory. That, or, they may do the whole “well, we had to undermine our own principled goals so that we can attain them in actuality later on” type of reasoning, That is akin to saying “we beat you because really we love you.”

    Whether the NDP or Progressives are playing a similar game, I am not sure, but we cannot deny that we have one right of center party and others being center-left and more left. Thus, it would stand to reason that while Harper commands a majority, a vast amount of the popular vote went to center-left and progressive parties. Note that I am emphasizing the result of the positive nature in voting, since in a lot of cases “not voting for X leader or party” is not informative much less a compelling argument. There is strategic voting, but unless each and everyone of voting public is asked the reason why they voted, you can only conclude that they voted for someone as opposed to against . After all, in Liberal regimes, while they had similar numbers, the other votes when to both progressive, right wing, and separatist parties. Either way you cut it, Liberal, NDP (and in cases, the Bloc), constitute a voting block left of the center, so I think it is still sound to say that still a little over half of the voting public may not be approximately represented by the Harper government. The situation would be vastly different if the NDP or the Liberals were replaced by a right of center party. I say approximately because the implicit aspect of FPTP is broad consensus here.

    Aside from the progressives within the left of centre voting bloc, there may be individuals in there who would consider Harper as the second choice. Given the geographical range of the CPC support, I think CPC broad consensus was achieved even though the electoral distribution does not numerically bear this out. The reason why I say this is outside of hardcore partisans, Mike Harris had a broad consensus when it was discovered that due to some polling in the most urban progressive areas in Ontario, voters considered him an acceptable “second choice.” I know this reasoning sounds weird, but FPTP demands parties to achieve a broad consensus in order to win seats, even if they have less than the majority of the popular vote. That has always been the trade off. We know second choices exist in the minds of voters, otherwise we would not have swing ridings or long term switches of party allegiances in some ridings.

  5. As a traditionalist Conservative, I have come to an epiphany of sorts over the last five years. I have always been a vociferous supporter of the FPTP system, as it is part of our treasured inheritance, and like the Crown in Canada a sharp indicator of who we are, and who we have been.

    However, I do not believe that Canadians are deserving of this inheritance anymore, as their constant aping of all things Americans make the FPTP system inappropriate for this thinly populated and highly regionalised nation.

    Therefore, as a traditionalist Conservative, I now support the Proportional Representation (PR) system; I do this because I think that Canada needs moderate government in order to withstand absroption into the fast-declining American Empire.

    Only the PR system can allow the mix of parties, that will engender contant minorities and the creation of a “coalition culture” within the political culture. This we need to maintain our Sovereignty – in what has now become an extremely dangerous and chaotic world.

    The World is now a more dangerous place than it has ever been – more dangerous than the Cold War period, as now regional hostilities are conjoined to ever-greater environmental catastrophes, re-emergent and radical sectarianisms, and unrestrained corporate and financial power.

  6. Interesting to compare the amount of outrage over this to the amount of ink spilled over Kenney rehiring (and promoting) his aide who took the fall for his own blatant misuse of his office. Nothing compared to a 21 year old holding a quaint homemade sign with a tame message in front of the likes of Verner and Smith, but still.

  7. …the majority of Canadians really did vote in support of spending untold billions of dollars on dubious military hardware, vastly expanding the penal system, eliminating gun control, continuing the pointless wars in faraway lands, surrendering national sovereignty for the sake of a phantom “perimeter security” zone, engaging in so-called “free trade” agreements…and maintaining massive transfers of wealth in the form of egregious corporate welfare…[T]he available political alternatives to that “agenda” were actually deemed by a majority of voters to be a less desirable offering…

    Unfortunately, of the “available political alternatives”, one was separatist, one was socialist, one was led by Liz May, and the other has traditionally been fairly comfortable with most of the outrageous anti-Canadian policies you enumerate.

    As Shiner notes, the media and commentariat hysterics over this event have been off-the-dial disproportionate to the gravity of the act. The young lady farted in what had already been turned into an overflowing urine-streaked Port-O- Potty.

  8. SF: Well, exactly. The alternatives to Harper were all deeply unsatisfactory and the results of the election quite accurately reflected that sentiment.

    As for Ms. DePape’s little stunt, it’s hard to take seriously the criticisms and outrage about her “disrespecting the institution” blah, blah, blah, when the HarperCons have shown nothing but contempt for parliament for many years now. Unsurprising that they should demand respect now that they hold all the cards and have the POWER to do whatever they want in their “benign dictatorship”…

  9. Tomm

    I notice (with some satisfaction) that Heather Mallick has written a column supporting Ms. DePape and that CUPW has apparently offered her a job.

    This lady needs to be placed on a tall pedestal. Journalists should write articles without end, about her likes and dislikes, interests, and what she plans to do next. She embodies the “hero” culture that is the smiley face of the anarchists.

    This, of course, will lead to untold numbers of copy cats, some of them ending violently. The journalists will just keep on writing articles about our sons and daughters and how they are becoming the keeper of our democracy.

    Except of course, when Thoreau talked about “Civil Disobedience” he may have expected its application in areas a little more weighty than this.

    Perhaps if the government water boarded her and threw her in jail for 5 years, instead of her getting union job offers and a lot of media time…

  10. Tomm

    My previous post is not meant to imply Mc. DePape be arrested.

    I think her losing her job was appropriate.

    I would ask that the journalists to find out who taught Ms. DePape at the UOttawa and then interview them to find out what sort of crap about our governance was fed to her during her time at that august institution.

  11. I would ask that the journalists to find out who taught Ms. DePape at the UOttawa and then interview them to find out what sort of crap about our governance was fed to her…

    Probably involved a lot of garbage about “freedom” and related gibberish.

  12. Tomm

    Or perhaps they got her all in a lather about how the Conservative’s have a hidden agenda to destroy our society.

    I think it would not be out of place to request interviews with her Poli Sci profs.

    Maybe it was as simple as her watching UOttawa muzzle Ann Coulter. Perhaps she thought that if they can take down a neanderthal, then so can she.

  13. Or perhaps they got her all in a lather about how the Conservative’s[sic] have a hidden agenda to destroy our society.

    Their agenda is hidden?

    Maybe it was as simple as her watching UOttawa muzzle Ann Coulter.

    Coulter “muzzled” herself. She refused to go ahead with the lecture. It was a cheap publicity stunt; read the news reports.

    Perhaps she thought that if they can take down a Neanderthal [well said!], then so can she.

    Well, hope springs eternal, Tomm, even in the Harper Ice Age.

  14. Tomm

    SF,

    If Harper wanted to destroy our society… all he had to do was stay out of politics so that the Liberal Party of Canada could continue governing.

    I was so looking forward to 5 more years of Paul Martin, Ralph, John, Bob, Ken, Hedy, Marlene, Carolyn, Stephane, and of course… Belinda.

  15. Pingback: Business must be slow… | The Trusty Tory

  16. It seems The Trusty Tory and his ilk have no problem with the idea of the United States Government blackballing and creating a dossier for this young person for her silly little (and disrespectful) stunt.

  17. It seems The Trusty Tory and his ilk have no problem with the idea of the United States Government blackballing and creating a dossier for this young person…

    They love the idea of the girl being thrown to the wolves. And what would you have expected else? These are the people who applauded the news that an American intelligence officer at Gitmo had threatened 15-year-old Omar Khadr with gang rape. Morally, CPC droids are black holes.

  18. Nomennovum

    Speaking for all Americans, we don’t want to “asorb” you into our empire. We love you all and want what’s best for everyone everywhere.

    Except for Celine Dion. We really hate her. She’s getting really really annoying now. She screams too much and she’s ugly. Take her back or we’ll again threaten that murdering jihadi prick … I mean, poor little Khadr … that we’ll make him the bitch of some bigger jihadist.

    Oh, and except for CWTF too. We don’t like him. At all. Someone needs to slap him upside the head.

  19. This is a polemic. She is indeed correct in saying the majority of Canadians didn’t vote for the Harper majority. The majority of those who showed up to vote, did vote for the Conservative party, though. Those two things need to be distinct.

    I don’t like her myself, I found her call for a Canadian ‘Arab Springs’ to be ignorant, thoughtless and offensive. The glib comparison of our electoral system she doesn’t like (I’d like some reform too, don’t get me wrong) to the lack of democracy and well, totalitarianism over there is really stupid. If you even idlely follow the news, you’d know that hundreds of citizens have been killed by stubborn and authoritative government. Much blood has bee shed. There’s no sane reason to glamorize that whole thing.

    Revolutions aren’t always a good thing. Many of them either fail, or lead to something on par, or worse. Egypt, for example, had a revolution… now they’re under military dictatorship… protesting again.

    It’s silly to call for a Canadian ‘arab springs’.

  20. I find her to be completely naive. This entire “60% of the population doesn’t support Harper claim” is utter nonsense, as I consider the 39% of the population that didn’t bother to vote support to be his supporters through complacency. So by this logIc, 64% of the entire voting pool did rubber-stamp the agenda that this government presented.

    The orange-wave artificially empowered urban youth in Canada and led them to believe actual NDP electoral victory to be possible. It isn’t and won’t ascend beyond their current seat count. They’re disappointed by the legal and legitimate election of the Cons to a majority after realizing they have zero power at this point . ChIldidh antics are now their source of empowerment, since the left tossed their influential position in Government away for an election they wouldn’t win.

  21. tofkw

    I agree, she was completely off the mark by saying that the ~40% that didn’t vote was part of her “majority” that did not support Harper.

    Bullshit! That group that didn’t vote is compliant with what was going on in our government, so therefore because they didn’t ‘bother’ to vote, they support Harper.

    Anyone, at anytime, who does not vote is, in fact, supporting the incumbent. Furthermore, anyone who doesn’t vote has no right to bitch afterwards about the election results.

  22. Jib Halyard

    Red Tory,
    I still don’t get your math.
    The majority of Canadians voted for parties other than the so-called “Tories”.
    The majority did not vote for the things you describe.
    That is a simple objective fact.

  23. Jib Halyard

    and i agree that the non-voters can take a flying fuck at the moon, as you say.
    Most of those who cast ballots opposed harper

  24. (I Agree that as far as election results go, none-voters are irrelevant in the final results.)

    Anyone that claims that the people that didn’t vote are against Harper are ignoring an important trend. Last election saw an increase in turnout and an increase in CPC popular support. So if you extrapolate that trend through the rest of the none-voting population, CPC support increases…

    Short of actually asking all of them if they are happy with the outcome, we will never know for sure. But the math does not favour the anti-CPC/anti-Harper hypothesis.

  25. Craig Chamberlain

    “Shut down the schools! Do it for the children! For their own good! We’re under attack!”

    You’ve met your future PM.

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