Liberal Tourism

Try to contain your excitement… Iggy’s launching yet another one of his dreadfully awkward, barely noticeable “Talking to Canadians” tours of the electoral hinterland! This time with his shadow Labour Critic Maria Minna and a clutch of other Liberal MPs you’ve probably never heard of in tow. Together, they’ll be “criss-crossing the country” ahead of a possible election, attempting to stoke the resentment of “working families” while pandering to them with lofty but fiscally impossible schemes addressing the problems of childcare, tuition fees and youth unemployment.

Hang on. Isn’t this sort of bunkum Jack Layton’s job?

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15 Comments

Filed under 2011 Canadian Election, Economy, Liberal Party of Canada, Michael Ignatieff

15 responses to “Liberal Tourism

  1. Moebius

    Well, it worked before.

    Oh, wait….

  2. TofKW

    In fact Moebius it did work before, for Jean Chretien. However he managed to attain the ‘little guy from Shawinigan’ moniker well before he became Liberal leader, which helped to give the impression of being a commoner in touch with the electorate. I very much doubt Ignatieff can ever manage to be even half as endearing as Chretien was with the general public.

  3. Chrétien always made me smile… Ignatieff just make me wince.

  4. John Q. Canuck: “Gee, it was really nice to meet you, Mr. Ignatieff. Thanks for taking some time to ‘Talk to Canadians’ and purr some fuzzy banalities instead of wasting time with the usual inside-the-Queensway stuff, like doing your fucking job and bringing down a patently tired, cynical, corrupt, and morally bankrupt government”.

  5. SF: Perhaps if he hadn’t effectively propped up the “patently tired, cynical, corrupt, and morally bankrupt government” for the past several years, he might have a little more credibility in that regard.

  6. We should thank the stars for Harper & Co ….. really!

    If not for the existence of these fools, some party would have a Majority Government by now.

    Giving ANY of these parties a majority would be beyond folly in my opinion. Better to have them all hemmed-in by a hung parliament.

    Fundamentally, there is very little difference between the CPC & the LPC – both are free-trading continentalists.

  7. Rotterdam

    Excitement is in the air. This poor guy is yearning his return to Boston.

  8. hitfan

    Politics is all about timing in regards to the ebb and flow of the mood of the electorate. Warren Kinsella and all the other liberal bloggers speak of Chrétien as some political genius.

    If Chrétien had won the ’84 Liberal leadership race, he would have been crushed by the Conservative/Mulroney wave later that year. Sixteen years of Liberal incumbency, scandals and arrogance had taken their toll.

    The winning conditions for the Liberals are non-existent right now. A foo-foo scandal like Bev Oda’s is not enough to make voters change their mind.

  9. sapphireandsteel

    “Sixteen years of Liberal incumbency, scandals and arrogance had taken their toll.”

    Well, not really. It was more a combination of frustrations with Trudeau, mistakes by Turner himself (patting asses… not the smartest of moves) and a collapse of Liberal support in Quebec. Throw in Turner’s inept performance at the debates and his inability to counter “you had a decision Mr Turner” and you have pretty much the building blocks for the transition.

    The funny thing is hitfan, you dont actually know what the winning conditions for the Liberals are. Neither do I & to be honest trying to find some direction from the polls is about as useful as looking for a gold nugget in your own shit.

    But hey, if you believe bluster, rhetoric, historical revisionism and talking points are what got Mulroney elected and not his merits… be my guest.

  10. I’m thinking that pretty soon the Liberals can start betting on the chronic short-term memory problems of the general electorate who won’t even remember who preceded Harper. Seriously!

  11. Tomm

    RT,

    I think you are foreshadowing the future.

    Ignatieff is not getting better at his job, he is just getting less easy to listen to. His pretzelled arguments have struck a cord with just too many people.

    At one point in time he has been for everything and at another point he has been against everything. I actually blame his handlers. The positions he is given to espouse are just so obviously shallow.

    But let’s look into the future. Harper is building a body of work that is filling the cranium of voters. Pretty soon our memory of the previous Liberal governemnt will be dim enough that we will vote out the current government without thought to the alternative.

    Perhaps the Liberal’s don’t need to ever enter the wilderness of re-definition, just hang around playing dice (like they are doing right now) and wait until the people vote out the incumbents.

  12. I don’t know if that’s actually their “strategy” but history shows it to be a plan of sorts insofar as that if you hang in there long enough as opposition, eventually people will get sick and tired of the government and “throw the bums out” with little regard for the alternative. That, however, isn’t a viable approach for Ignatieff, who has just one kick at the can before he gets ousted and unfortunately for him, he really doesn’t have a lot of maneuvering room in this economy to differentiate himself from the so-called Conservatives.

  13. Tomm

    RT,

    Yes, I agree that if the strategy is to be second place until the roof caves in and then to play the Chancy Gardner card (i.e. “Being There”), it is very unlikely that Ignatieff will still be their leader. He is in his 60’s and often looks/acts even older.

    As Chancy liked to say, the economy is like a garden, it has seasons…

  14. Heh. Ignatieff might benefit from watching Being There and perhaps emulating the naïve simplicity of Chauncey Gardiner. That approach may well have more appeal than being a convoluted egghead awkwardly pandering to “ordinary Canadians” from the side of a tour bus.

  15. Moebius

    I don’t need to be convinced about JC’s power; I voted from his party twice. Chretien was different from the last 3 Lib leaders. He had political instinct, up to the point where his arrogance finally unraveled the party.

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