Stephen Harper @ Davos

Ze Dear Leader appears on der Weltbühne in Davos, Switzerland (mit ein teleprompter!!!) after a lengtzy introductory monologue by Col. Klink.

Update: CTV news coverage of the event and the sharp criticism Canada’s environmental policies by other world leaders.

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44 Comments

Filed under Stephen Harper

44 responses to “Stephen Harper @ Davos

  1. counter-coulter

    O/T: Today Obama was invited to speak, and went, to the House Republican retreat in Baltimore. I think the Republicans thought they would be able to embarass him, but man were they wrong. Here’s the video….it’s awesome!

  2. Ti-Guy

    Ich liebe den Bundesführer!

  3. C-C: I caught some of that this morning on CNN. It was indeed awesome. I’d love to see more of those kind of “fish out of water” encounters.

    Thanks for the link to the full video and text, btw. I was waiting for your friends at The Uptake to post it so I could share it here.

  4. Tomm

    RT,

    thanks for posting the speech.

  5. Ti-Guy

    Wasn’t counter-coulter interested in what our PM had to say at Davos?

    I certainly couldn’t care less what Obama has to say to Republicans. I’d rather wait and see if it actually ends up mattering.

  6. Tomm

    “…the link between poverty and the appalling mortality of mothers and small children in the third world…

    …not just words on a page… real hunger, real suffering, real people dying …”

    Harper is going to put this on the G8 Agenda as the chair.

    Jim Travers has already reduced this to ugliness using his own unique position to poison the minds of those willing to believe his words.

    Lovely stuff this partisan bickering.

    I noticed in the US Congress that when Obama spoke on behalf of America, everybody applauded. Maybe we could learn something from that.

  7. Ti-Guy

    Jim Travers has already reduced this to ugliness using his own unique position to poison the minds of those willing to believe his words.

    We don’t anyone to help us suspend our disbelief, you credulous rube.

  8. Ti-Guy

    “need anyone”

  9. Tomm

    Ti,

    You are mistaken if you think there aren’t people reading Travers with their heads bobbing up and down like some shore bird.

  10. Tomm — I noticed in the US Congress that when Obama spoke on behalf of America, everybody applauded. Maybe we could learn something from that.

    I don’t know about that. There was a lot of the usual partisanship in the ceremonial ovations given. I think you’re wrong to believe there’s anything we could learn about political comity from our American friends.

  11. I just got called a troll by Tomm on Far and Wide’s site…and he was “trolling” spewing the same stuff.

    Apparently, Harper hates conventions like Davos (too elistist for him) and never used to attend – duh, political strategy and photo-op time.

  12. Tomm

    RT,

    When Obama spoke about democratic policy the Republican’s sat on their hands, but when he spoke about “America” they were all together.

    I think we can learn a lot about how they (Congress) join together when confronting issues outside their borders.

  13. Tomm

    Rural,

    I called you a troll because you ignored the topic posted by our host to tell the world that Susan Delacourt and Kady O’Malley were catching the “Cons” “lying” with our tax dollars.

    Troll much?

  14. Tomm — I don’t put too much stock into support demonstrated in response to rhetorical flights of fancy about “America” — after all, children in that country are indoctrinated to swear an almost religious oath of allegiance to the flag and all of the patently false pretense for which it’s imagined to stand.

  15. Ti-Guy

    You are mistaken if you think there aren’t people reading Travers with their heads bobbing up and down like some shore bird.

    I’m not suggesting there aren’t. It just doesn’t take a genius to be highly skeptical of der Harpenführer’s blue-sweatered cynicism and opportunism. We’ve had four years of it.

    Besides, these are all millenium goals that were committed to back in 2000.

  16. Tomm

    Ti,

    Much better.

    Canada has often pledged to be generous with the world and then so often falls short.

    I hope that Harper kicking this door open, and then sticking it on the G8 agenda may be something that we actually can lead with.

    I wonder if Bono will come?

  17. Tomm

    RT,

    I’ve got a niece (Canadian) living in the US with barely school aged kids. She had no idea that they had learned the Pledge of Allegiance by heart in their first year of school.

    Get’em young. I wonder if they’ve filled out NRA application forms yet?

  18. Ti-Guy

    Canada has often pledged to be generous with the world and then so often falls short.

    You notice with the wingnuts, when it comes close to a valid criticism of Big Daddy, it quickly reverts to a default criticism of Canada as a whole.

    “It’s not Harper who’s failing us, it’s we who’ve failed him!”

    Just shut up, Tomm. Shut. Up.

  19. Tomm

    Ti,

    I actually laughed out loud. You gotta take this on the road. Next time I’m in Prince Albert, I’ll look for you at Yuk Yuks.

    What are you criticizing? Are you criticizing Harper because he gave a speech? because it was coherent? Because he (as G8 and G20 chair) pitched something to alleviate human suffering?

    I’m at a loss.

    Why don’t you just come out and say that you’re on the road doing Harper jokes and will be out my way. Sell me a t-shirt.

    At least that’s honest and you can make a buck out of it.

  20. Ti-Guy

    I’m criticising your mawkishness.

    My evaluation of Harper and his government, as with any PM and government, continues to rely on standard performance metrics.

  21. Tomm

    Ti,

    You keep using words I don’t understand; so I ran to google and found out that you think I am excessively and objectionably sentimental.

    My wife will be surprised at that. She actually thinks I’m a…

    Actually, better not go there, or I’ll see it thrown back at me.

    Keep on the Sunny Side.

  22. Tomm — I’m old enough to recall having to stand and sing “O’ Canada” each morning, followed by a class recitation of the “Lord’s Prayer” and a half hour discussing the significance of various passages from Bible selected by our teacher before class started each day. I thought these obligatory rituals were quaint at the time.

    Later however, I pretty much dropped out of school in favour of getting high all day and was eventually arrested and charged for vandalizing my former teacher’s classroom in an outburst of angry, punkish exuberance. Life is curious…

  23. Tomm

    RT,

    Great story. A kid’s got to rebel.

    I recall a few not for prime time stories myself.

    I tried to keep it all at a level without actually hurting others. I’m sure I didn’t succeed, but that was a line I tried not to cross.

    I must have had the same personality as now. This one kid in my high school that just hated me. I didn’t even know him that well, but I’m sure it must have been something, or several somethings I said that drove him nuts.

    Probably a relative of Ti’s.

  24. Ti-Guy

    and a half hour discussing the significance of various passages from Bible selected by our teacher before class started each day.

    I went to Catholic school and even *we* didn’t do that.

    Probably a relative of Ti’s.

    They/we all went to French schools. “Vive la différence,”Chacun à son gout,” “Joie de vivre” are not just platitudes, you know. Trust me on that.

    I didn’t bother anyone in high school and no one bothered me.

  25. Ti-Guy

    I’ll add:

    In fact, I was completely astonished to find out, when I moved to Southern Ontario to go to university, that high school students stigmatised other students who were in math clubs, or drama clubs, or band or “Reach For the Top” or cheer leading or sports or student council.

    I thought that was just something you saw on American teevee.

  26. I went to Catholic school and even *we* didn’t do that.

    It was an affectation of certain “progressive” teachers at the time. I’m sure we could have stopped the practice, but the truth is I quite enjoyed the lively philosophical discussions that followed on from the readings.

  27. Ti-Guy

    but the truth is I quite enjoyed the lively philosophical discussions that followed on from the readings.

    What class was this?

  28. jkg

    Heh, am I the only one who went through the ‘terrible’ public schools? :)

    I actually had to take religion courses on the weekend by correspondence with a nun from Guelph because my unilingual protestant father summarily rejected the request of my mother to send us to Francophone Catholic school. My mother ensured that I still got a religious education, so on Sunday afternoons while I was learning about the various exploits of the Lord, my heathen friends were outside running and goading me to come with them. Needless to day, my mother watched me like a hawk.

    I have to say though, since I had to participate in all youth activities with the my parish, I was always put off by the snobbishness of the Catholic students of my age. There aghast that I did not know specific instances in the Bible like the Tongues of Fire. It was really annoying, so in some cases, I just skipped it and went back to my house after an hour. It was hard to keep that up in a very small town, but it made it manageable.

  29. Ti-Guy

    I actually had to take religion courses on the weekend by correspondence with a nun from Guelph because my unilingual protestant father summarily rejected the request of my mother to send us to Francophone Catholic school.

    That’s the kind of thing people have to settle on before they get married and start having kids.

  30. Ti-Guy — What class was this?

    That was Grade 7.

    It was more of a Socratic dialogue than anything else.

  31. jkg

    That’s the kind of thing people have to settle on before they get married and start having kids.

    I think they did, but my mother apparently kept on trying, since there were 5 of us.

  32. Ti-Guy

    I think they did, but my mother apparently kept on trying, since there were 5 of us.

    Well, obviously they didn’t settle it, since she kept on trying.

    There were five of us as well. My mother, an educated Québécoise figured the kids should go to English school when she moved to Ontario. My father, a less educated Franco-Ontarian insisted they go to French school, although he didn’t care whether they learned anything or not. So, they agreed; he deferred to her on the major pedagogic issues and he decided on the cultural ones.

    :) That’s total bullshit of course. It just worked out that way. But my parents didn’t disagree when it came to raising their kids. And they had decided that before they got married.

  33. Ti-Guy

    It was more of a Socratic dialogue than anything else.

    Socratic dialogue in grade 7?

    Where did you go to school? Who robbed you of experiencing the growth spurts, the spontaneous hirsuteness, the sudden, shocking odours from the fold areas and that film that appears one day on the face like the thin cover of ice on a pond on the first frosty day in late November?

    …Meh. Needs editing. Where’s Sir Francis?

  34. My parents gave up on religion when they emigrated to Canada. It was part of their liberation from the traditional norms of England.

  35. Ti-Guy

    My parents gave up on religion when they emigrated to Canada. It was part of their liberation from the traditional norms of England.

    Were they clear on what they were abandoning? Was it the imposition of class discipline and the authoritarian acceptance of dogma, or religion itself?

  36. Where did you go to school? Who robbed you of experiencing the growth spurts…

    Here in Victoria. And nobody robbed me of the usual adolescent experiences. I drank heavily, smoked a lot of drugs, tried to commit suicide a few times and had more than my share of scary run-ins with the police… For a nerdy, bookish kid it wasn’t an altogether bad trip.

    By the way, that teacher that used to challenge us to debate the message of Biblical parables…I ended up writing his class report cards for him because he’d broken his writing hand in some sports injury and so I acted as his “secretary” because I had good penmanship and could spell accurately.

  37. Ti-Guy

    I’m outta here.

    Good luck you, Red.

  38. Were they clear on what they were abandoning?

    It was never articulated as such, but there was never any doubt in my mind they were immensely glad to be free of the rigidly stratified class structure they’d grown up with.

  39. I’m outta here.

    Too much information…

    I should be more discrete and less boring.

  40. jkg

    Well, obviously they didn’t settle it, since she kept on trying.

    That was rather the weird thing about it; my mother was tasked with raising us in almost entirety as my father was fairly indifferent, so it was rather surprising to my mother as to his steadfastness when it came to where we would go to school. So, it may have been settled, yet in her mind, it wasn’t. My weekend religion correspondence courses and my youth group activities were probably work arounds or compromises to that., and given that she had free reign in virtually everything else, she eventually settled with her own solution. My father, in large part, was tasked with skills based teachings as in the timeless art of the Protestant work ethic.

    My mother feels a bit vindicated however because my siblings and I are bilingual as much as a Late French Immersion program could afford (within limits of course), but I think we were just lucky to have lived in a region where the French language education was very good. When I went to McMaster, I noticed a distinct difference between the bilingual anglophones of the Valley and Eastern Ontario and those from Toronto. I couldn’t help but chuckle when they proudly demonstrated their ‘bilingualism’ only to commit the well known anglicismes I learned to weed out by high school.

    I should be more discrete and less boring.

    Heh, I must lead a boring life then given my openness :). Those life experiences, Red I suspect, were probably more instructive and salutary to your development than pious zeal to doctrine and social prescription.

    With regards to your parents’ abandoning religion, that was exactly the same thing that my father did. Our family has been in a small town for over a century, and he grew up as a Methodist. After marrying my Irish Catholic mother, he just stopped, but later, I discovered that he really didn’t find any meaning in all the religious protocols and rituals he had to do. He still likes to make Catholic jokes sometimes, which could explain my mother’s zeal to get us a religious education.

  41. counter-coulter

    Wasn’t counter-coulter interested in what our PM had to say at Davos?

    Maybe I’ll wait and see if it actually ends up mattering. ;)

  42. Man.. this topic sure took an interesting turn.

    I’m actually quasi-supportive of Ti-Guy’s comments, oddly enough.

    What it comes down to is “the proof is in the pudding”. Harper has said a lot of things, and delivered on some, but ignored others.. so, I guess we’ll see.

    However – it is fair to say that his initial response to Haiti has been gratifying, garnering praise from Bill Clinton as well for his work and for the efforts of all Canadians. That has to be a good thing, I think, but as Ti-Guy points out, talk is cheap.. we’ll wait and see what comes of it.

    Of course the feminist lobby in Canada is already attacking him because helping women and children dying at childbirth isn’t helping women broadly enough and the nature of the help just reinforces stereotypes of women as baby-makers.

    Kind of like complaining about a doctor saving your life after a road accident because he didn’t remove a mole on the back of your neck which might be cancerous.

    Sometimes, the proper response is a simple “thank-you”.

  43. Rob — Discussions often take curious twists and turns off the designated path around here…

    Regarding your comment, I think we could all learn something important from this crisis: both in terms of the response of the Haitian people and the millions around the world that have generously extended charity to alleviate the suffering. It’s unfortunate however that it took such a massive catastrophe to bring this about.

  44. jkg

    It’s unfortunate however that it took such a massive catastrophe to bring this about.

    From the first episode of Newswipe, Dan Gardner, a journalist for the Citizen actually gives a pretty stark explanation as to why that is.

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