Mitt-tastic Tales of the Ordinary!

True Fact: After a hectic day of impersonating a human being on the campaign trail, zillionaire and would-be Republican front-runner Willard “Mitt” Romney likes nothing more than to chow down on a sugary bowl of cold breakfast cereal every night before hitting the sack. Why, that makes him just like… well, not many people, actually. But hey, nice try!

What other fascinating details of Mitt’s lifestyle as an ordinary humanoid visiting from planet Kolob will be revealed by his campaign team in the weeks and months to come? Stay tuned!

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6 Comments

Filed under 2012 U.S. Election

6 responses to “Mitt-tastic Tales of the Ordinary!

  1. That’s actually pretty common, however calling it “cold cereal” is as normal as saying “picture box” and “decent republican”…. And Chex? Who eats Chex?

  2. D.I.D.

    I cannot understand how even the most rabid political junkies can stomach watching American ‘politics’ so closely. There is so much rhetoric and so little substance, that I have never understood why Canadians should even bother with it except to insure that the trading relationship remains decent.

    It’s the election campaign equivalent of Otto von Bismark’s laws-and-sausage-making analogy. For anyone to willingly subject themselves to it nonstop seems to be a political form of sadomasochism.

  3. Scott: I guess not too many people eat a bowl of porridge or cream of wheat before going to bed (hence, distinguishing it as “cold cereal”). Personally, I just think the whole idea of eating any kind of cereal other than in the morning is kind of messed up.

  4. D.I.D.: Well, there is definitely an element of masochism involved in the observation of American politics, especially paying close attention to punditry with which you vehemently disagree.

    Why do some Canadians do it? That a question that comes up frequently – and here is my answer:

    First of all, U.S. politics is far more entertaining and engaging than our political scene. Plus, the media coverage is incredibly more extensive and widely accessible. For me personally, that’s an important factor given this is a “video blog” for the most part and there are a lot more resources available that deal with U.S. politics as opposed to Canadian material which is quite hard to come by. In Canada, the coverage of politics in the media is extremely limited and for significant portions of the year (when parliament takes long holidays during much of the winter and almost all of summer) it practically doesn’t exist at all! Even when it is being covered, it’s painfully dull and tedious for the most part

    Second, what happens in the U.S. affects us here – directly or indirectly in terms of legislation and its consequent economic and social impacts. In other respects, the ideological battles that are fought south of the border have a tendency to infiltrate our own political debates and influence the various players involved, so in that respect it’s worth keeping an eye on where various political memes originate, take form and become part of our own political discourse.

    Third, for those of us who grew up near the border (which is a significant number of Canadians), we cannot help but feel a deep affinity with the American scene via the media. Currently living here in Winnipeg, for example, a large part of the “local” spectrum of TV stations are from Fargo, Minneapolis, Spokane and Chicago. I don’t listen to the radio much anymore, but in the past it was a similar situation – many of the stations I tuned into were broadcasting from cities in the U.S. Figuratively speaking, it seems quite natural therefore to view that as your backyard and take interest in what’s going on there…

    So, does that reflect poorly on me because I’m more keenly fascinated by American politics as opposed to strictly domestic matters? Perhaps I should be spending my time railing against the proposed hike in local property taxes by the city, the shitty state of the roads, the crappy transit service, the crummy healthcare system that’s kept me waiting for over a year for an unnecessary MRI for my bone-dead hip, the mysterious activities of the provincial government here (nothing of which has been heard about since they were re-elected for the umpteenth time), or maybe even the thrilling NDP leadership race… Well, maybe so, but sorry, I find all that stuff remarkably tedious.

    Bottom line is that I post on what amuses, interests or annoys me. If that’s not your cup of tea, well so be it… There are plenty of other blogs out there gnashing their teeth and moaning about the latest imagined outrage by Dalton McGuinty, tilting at Stephen Harper’s incipient police state, pimping the virtues of Nathan Cullen, or whatever else tickles your fancy in the realm of Canadian politics.

  5. D.I.D.

    “First of all, U.S. politics is far more entertaining and engaging than our political scene. Plus, the media coverage is incredibly more extensive and widely accessible.”

    I used to think that as well, but the keyword here is once again ‘entertainment’ rather than ‘substance’. Once it became clear to me that there was next to nothing underlying all of the rhetoric, it suddenly became as dull as Canadian politics.

    “…Second, what happens in the U.S. affects us here – directly or indirectly in terms of legislation and its consequent economic and social impacts…”

    True, hence the caveat that we should be concerned if it affects the ‘trading relationship’.

    “So, does that reflect poorly on me because I’m more keenly fascinated by American politics as opposed to strictly domestic matters?”

    Hardly. No intentions of attack or insult; merely stating an observation that tends to rub me.

  6. DID: Usually the critique comes from American right-wingers who seem to feel that Canadians (at least if they’re not “conservative” and supportive of the Republican Party) have no business whatsoever commenting on U.S. politics.

    You’re certainly correct about the substance falling far short of the overblown rhetoric in American politics, especially these days. It’s hard to imagine a thoughtful program like Bill Buckley’s “Firing Line” existing in current political environment.

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